soothe


soothe
01. A good hot bath will help to [soothe] those sore muscles.
02. The smell of her perfume [soothed] and relaxed him, and he soon fell asleep.
03. The mother stroked her baby's back to [soothe] him, and put him to sleep.
04. The father held his daughter in his arms, and sang to her to [soothe] her after she woke up crying from a nightmare.
05. The young woman put on some [soothing] music, and sat down with a glass of wine to relax with her husband.
06. This cream works well to [soothe] dry, itchy skin.
07. You can [soothe] the pain of a bee sting by rubbing it with a piece of raw onion.
08. "Just relax and close your eyes," she said [soothingly].
09. He was desperate to find something to [soothe] his toothache.
10. Research shows that a good marriage [soothes] people, minimizing the negative health effects caused by an unhappy job.
11. Karl Marx believed that religion serves to [soothe] the exploited majority like an anesthetic.
12. Opera singer Maria Callas once observed that when music fails to agree to the ear, to [soothe] the ear and the heart and the senses, then it has missed the point.
13. Rev. James Bramston once stated that music has charms to [soothe] the savage beast.
14. During the Middle Ages, wine or beer was mixed with eggs, bread, sugar, and spices, and was used to [soothe] and heal the ill.
15. Honey is used in many cough syrups because its smooth, thick texture [soothes] throats.
16. Beauty experts say that cucumber helps cool, [soothe], refresh and hydrate the skin.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Soothe — (s[=oo][th]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Soothed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Soothing}.] [Originally, to assent to as true; OE. so[eth]ien to verify, AS. ges[=o][eth]ian to prove the truth of, to bear witness. See {Sooth}, a.] 1. To assent to as true. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soothe — [su:ð] v [T] [: Old English; Origin: sothian to prove the truth , from soth true ] 1.) to make someone feel calmer and less anxious, upset, or angry ▪ Lucy soothed the baby by rocking it in her arms. ▪ She made a cup of tea to soothe her nerves.… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • soothe — [ suð ] verb transitive 1. ) to make someone more calm and more relaxed when they are feeling nervous, worried, or upset: She was doing her best to soothe the crying baby. The news wasn t enough to soothe nerves on Wall Street. 2. ) to make… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • soothe — I verb allay, alleviate, ameliorate, appease, assuage, attemper, balm, becalm, blunt, calm, comfort, compose, deaden, dulcify, dull, ease, free from anxiety, free from pain, give relief, humor, hush, lenify, lenire, lessen, lull, mitigate,… …   Law dictionary

  • soothe — O.E. soðian show to be true, from soð true (see SOOTH (Cf. sooth)). Sense of quiet, comfort, mollify is first recorded 1690s, on notion of to assuage one by asserting that what he says is true (i.e. to be a yes man), a sense attested from 1560s …   Etymology dictionary

  • soothe — *calm, compose, quiet, quieten, still, lull, settle, tranquilize Analogous words: mollify, appease, placate, *pacify, propitiate, conciliate: allay, alleviate, assuage, mitigate, *relieve Antonyms: annoy: excite …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • soothe — [v] calm, ease allay, alleviate, appease, assuage, balm, becalm, butter up*, calm down, cheer, compose, console, cool, cool off*, dulcify, help, hush, lighten, lull, make nice*, make up, mitigate, mollify, pacify, patch things up*, play up to*,… …   New thesaurus

  • soothe — ► VERB 1) gently calm. 2) relieve (pain or discomfort). DERIVATIVES soother noun soothing adjective. ORIGIN Old English, «verify, show to be true», from SOOTH(Cf. ↑sooth) …   English terms dictionary

  • soothe — [so͞oth] vt. soothed, soothing [ME sothen < OE sothian, to bear witness to, prove true < soth: see SOOTH] 1. to make calm or composed, as by gentle treatment, flattery, etc.; appease; mollify 2. to allay or relieve (pain, an ache, etc.);… …   English World dictionary

  • soothe — UK [suːð] / US [suð] verb [transitive] Word forms soothe : present tense I/you/we/they soothe he/she/it soothes present participle soothing past tense soothed past participle soothed 1) to make someone more calm and more relaxed when they are… …   English dictionary